Last edited by Vigar
Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

5 edition of Stonewall Jacksons Foot Cavalry found in the catalog.

Stonewall Jacksons Foot Cavalry

by Walbrook D. Swank

  • 169 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Burd Street Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States - Civil War,
  • Military - United States,
  • Cavalry,
  • Military History - U.S. Civil War,
  • History,
  • Biography / Autobiography,
  • History: American,
  • Historical - U.S.,
  • Military,
  • Diaries,
  • Peyton, George Quintus

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages180
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8735624M
    ISBN 101572492112
    ISBN 109781572492110

    On Aug , the Stonewall Brigade repulsed the attack of the Union's Iron Brigade and rallied for a counterattack. Its acting commander, Colonel William S. Baylor, was killed. Colonel Andrew J. Grigsby assumed command and led the brigade through the Maryland Campaign and the Battle of Antietam. Company A, 13th Virginia Infantry Regiment, known as the Montpelier Guard, was a part of General “Stonewall” Jackson’s famous “Foot Cavalry.” During the war, three of the unit’s commanders were promoted to general, and two of them were killed in battle, namely Lieutenant General Ambrose P. Hill and Brigadier General James B. Terrill.

    Synopsis. Stonewall Jackson was born in Clarksburg (then Virginia), West Virginia, on Janu A skilled military tactician, he served as a Confederate general under Robert E. Lee in the Born:   The impressive feat helped his men earn the nickname “foot cavalry.” He is equally known for his famous flank march and attack at Chancellorsville on May 2, , which completely surprised the Army of the Potomac’s XI Corps and rolled the Union line up. The Ultimate Stonewall Jackson Collection comprehensively covers every aspect of Brand: Charles River Editors.

      Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Rob Wilson. Part One: A “most splendid affair” at Catharine Furnace. On May 2, , the day that Lt. General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson was mortally wounded at the Battle of Chancellorsville, his Second Corps “foot cavalry” fought two separate times with the Army of the Potomac. Get this from a library! Stonewall Jackson's foot cavalry: Company A, 13th Virginia Infantry. [George Quintus Peyton; Walbrook D Swank].


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Stonewall Jacksons Foot Cavalry by Walbrook D. Swank Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Stonewall" Jackson's "Foot Cavalry" Paperback – December 1, by Walbrook D. Swank (Editor)Format: Paperback. Stonewall Jackson's Foot Cavalry: Company A, 13th Virginia Infantry.

In the Stonewall Jacksons Foot Cavalry book days of the war there were approximately 1, men in the 10 companies of the 13th Virginia Infantry Regiment. As the war progressed, attrition severely reduced the ranks, and only 63 Author: Walbrook D.

Swank. One Of Jackson's Foot Cavalry: His Experience And What He Saw During The War [Worsham, John H.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. One Of Jackson's Foot Cavalry: His Experience And What He Saw During The War /5(2).

Fifth in Bantam's Eyewitness to the Civil War series, this remarkable memoir by an enlisted man under Stonewall Jackson brilliantly captures the life of the common foot-soldier of the Confederacy.

Chronicled here are the hardships, long odds, and unorthodox maneuvers that struck fear in the hearts of Union generals and made Jackson a legend/5. item 2 Stonewall Jackson's Foot Cavalry: Company A, 13th Virginia Infantry (NoDust) 1 - Stonewall Jackson's Foot Cavalry: Company A, 13th Virginia Infantry (NoDust) $ Free shipping.

Lisa Jackson Books. Swank Men's Interest Magazines. Paperback Cookbook. Swank Magazines   Editorial Reviews. Davis' exceptional biography of Stonewall Jackson breathes new life into the Civil War legend and his Foot Cavalry.

Davis deftly reveals the relevance today of the man who created a textbook on tactics by accomplishing so much, so often, with so little.”/5(10). They were known as ”Jackson’s Foot Cavalry”— so called for their ability to cover more than 30 miles a day — cavalry distance — on the march.

Virginians all, they formed a division of troops under the command of General Thomas J. ”Stonewall” Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia in In his book, One of Jackson's Foot Cavalry: His Experience and What He Saw During the WarIncluding a History of "F Company," Richmond, Va., 21st Regiment Virginia Infantry, Second Brigade, Jackson's Division, Second Corps, A.

Va., Worsham describes joining Company F, Virginia Volunteer Troops after the Confederate siege of Fort Sumter and traces his war experience and the. On The March With Jackson's Foot Cavalry Friday, September 2, Summer Update.

Once again, I've been delinquent about posting --but I haven't been that way about my painting and reading of Civil War books. Stonewall Jackson at Cedar Mountain. It remains one of my favorite books. One of Jackson's foot cavalry: his experience and what he saw during the warincluding a history of "F Company," Richmond, Va., 21st Regiment Virginia Infantry, Second Brigade, Jackson's Division, Second Corps, A.

Va., by John H Worsham. Jackson’s forces marched about miles in just 3 months, earning the nickname “foot cavalry.” Although Jackson’s Valley Campaign was an amazing campaign still studied by military officers around the world, he is equally known for his famous flank march and 5/5(1).

Stonewall's Foot Cavalryman. Hardcover, Austin: First Edition; First Printing. Very Good+. Andrew Davidson Long was, according to the Dallas Morning News, the last known member of Stonewall's Brigade. His son, Walter Long, wrote this book about the Civil War and his father's experiences in the Stonewall Edition: First Edition; First Printing.

Stonewall Jackson's Foot Cavalry marched miles in 48 days during a campaign, engaging in no less than a dozen battle along the way. Praise for Stonewall Jackson: A Biography “Davis' exceptional biography of Stonewall Jackson breathes new life into the Civil War legend and his Foot Cavalry.

Davis deftly reveals the relevance today of the man who created a textbook on tactics by accomplishing so much, so often, with so little.”.

On The March With Jackson's Foot Cavalry Tuesday, Decem complimented by the tactical prowess of Stonewall Jackson, were the primary factors of this remarkable Confederate victory. Highly recommended. This book is a fine collection of essays from leading scholars who address a wide range of topics, such as the Union high.

Foot cavalry was an oxymoron coined to describe the rapid movements of infantry troops serving under Confederate General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson during the American Civil War (–). The use of the words "foot" and "cavalry" to describe the same troops were seemingly in conflict with one another, as unlike normal cavalry units with horses, his men were infantry troops.

Contemporary drawing of Gen. Fremont crossing the north fork of the Shenandoah at Mt. Jackson in pursuit of Stonewall Jackson. This design is in the public domain. Category. Sunny South, Mar. 14, -- page 5 JACKSON'S FOOT CAVALRY The Paulding Clarion contained the following story of Stonewall Jackson: General Jackson, who seldom wears a uniform or any other mark of his grade or rank was passing a corn field one day and saw a long, lank sided confederate pulling roasting ears.

Jackson’s forces marched about miles in just 3 months, earning the nickname “foot cavalry.” Stonewall Jackson in the Seven Days Battles is an account of Jackson’s performance around Richmond in Junewhich culminated with Robert E. Lee taking command of the Army of Northern Virginia and driving the Army of the Potomac away from Pages:   And while the book details the astonishing distances that Stonewall's "foot cavalry" covered, Gwynne also notes that straggling and desertions were rampant in.

A Chaplain’s Recollections of “Stonewall” Jackson by Chaplain John William Jones scarcely rested his weary legions when he began his famous "Valley campaign" which won for his men the sobriquet of "Jackson's foot cavalry," and for himself world The Confederate Book of Quotes & Narratives - $ The Confederate Truth and Nothing.

The Collectors Library includes three books especially relevant to this topic: John H. Worsham's One of Jackson's Foot Cavalry (pictured); William T.

Poague's Gunner With Stonewall; and Richard Taylor's Destruction and Reconstruction."Stonewall" Jackson s "Foot Cavalry" is the wartime diary of the experiences of George Peyton.

A very pragmatic man, George Peyton often spoke out about things that worried or provoked him. Speaking of the relationship between two general officers he said, "Neither of them was willing to sacrifice his own little self-esteem for the good of his country.